1 Comment

A Practical Look at Go, Part 1

By Ken Walker Senior Software Engineer

About two years ago, I was working on a project written in the Go language. Go was originally developed by Google in 2007 for internal use, but was later released (open source) for general use. The project I was on was a large enterprise-wide service that collected large amounts of data (and did it well). This article introduces some of the interesting aspects of the language that might entice you to consider it for your own use, while pointing out a few things of which to be aware if you do.

Continue reading


Leave a comment

Noting Special Events in Retrospectives, to Capture Sources of Technical Debt

By Paul Cooper, Senior Performance Test Engineer

A fundamental expectation for a high performing Agile team is to have clear requirements to begin building the product(s) with sprints and validating demos. The Agile approach supports the philosophy and the reality as long as the integrity of the requirements remain clear and well thought through. What happens when requirements run amok? Continue reading


Leave a comment

Data Driven Testing – Separating Automation Code from Test Data

By Paul Cooper, Senior Performance Test Engineer

Test automation can be a costly time consuming endeavor. Often automation code and test data become entangled, leading to both fragile tests and fragile automation code. Once that happens, new tests will require programming to implement them. This helps us understand why testers now need coding skills. Design changes to the application, such as changing where or how a value is input, will also require updating the automation code and in turn may disrupt the test data.

Continue reading


1 Comment

Binding a Floating Point Property to a TextBox With a StringFormat in WPF

By Ken Walker Senior Software Engineer

Microsoft’s WPF bindings are a fine piece of technology. They are flexible and powerful, allowing changes to your objects’ properties to ripple through the rest of your application with a minimal amount of coding effort.
Continue reading


Leave a comment

Locating DOM Elements for Functional E2E Tests Using Custom Attributes

Larry Van Sickleby Larry Van Sickle, Senior Software Engineer

Protractor and Selenium are widely used tools for building functional end-to-end (e2e) automated tests. These tests execute a web-based application under test through a browser interface. The automated tests need to examine web page elements to determine whether their contents match expected results. They also need to operate on a webpage’s elements to drive the application. The tests need to click buttons, select from menus, and enter text in fields as part of the automated tests. A key problem and design decision is how the automated tests will locate elements in the DOM.

Continue reading


Leave a comment

Tuning a Windows Server for High Performance Applications

John Cavazosby John Cavazos, Senior Performance Test Engineer

In earlier blogs in this series we talked about configuring and tuning Unix and Linux based servers for high performance systems. Now, I will talk about configuring Windows servers. Windows servers are traditionally not used as servers anymore, but there are some applications where Windows is still the only option. Unix, and primarily Linux, have become the go-to platforms for servers due to their security, relatively low setup and maintenance costs and high performance output. Windows servers aren’t as easy to maintain, have a large memory footprint and until more recently have been problematic when it comes to security. They do often make great simulator machines especially when you have some old commodity Windows boxes lying around.

Continue reading