Adapting Enterprise Applications for Mobile Interfaces

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by Morgan McCollough, Senior Software Engineer

Morgan McCollough Bridge360Since the explosion of smartphone and mobile device technology spurred by the release of the iPhone in 2007 and Android-based devices starting in 2008, mobile devices are making more and more inroads into the enterprise business environment. Many major websites have released mobile versions that automatically adapt to the smaller screen real estate, and others have developed native applications that allow for even greater flexibility and function than is available on a web page. Smartphones and tablets are also being used as mobile point-of-sale devices, having completely replaced cash registers in some places. The future possibilities are nearly endless. However, integrating a new technology into an existing application infrastructure can be a challenge, especially for large enterprises, and in this post, we will discuss a basic strategy for adapting an existing enterprise application for use with a mobile interface.

Many large enterprises have invested in web application technologies, some homegrown and others off-the-shelf. While these applications are technically accessible from any device with a browser, adapting an application to a smaller interface can be a much bigger challenge than a simple website. Most applications have interactive editing features that can be difficult to navigate in a mobile interface. Creating a native application for these devices is arguably a better investment for the long run, especially considering that the enterprise has the luxury of dictating the specific platform to be used.

The environments for developing native mobile applications have evolved significantly, making the task of creating an interface for a mobile application a relatively easy one. The challenge then becomes the integration with back-end services. This is an area where the benefits of advancements in web services and service-oriented architecture (SOA) can really be seen. Enterprise applications that are already built on a service-oriented architecture will likely already have a web service interface to give clients access to data and application services. Also, development tools have advanced to the point that adding basic web services onto an existing server side application can be a relatively straightforward task. The key is to look at all mobile application interfaces in your enterprise simply as new consumers of these data and application services. If you carefully consider the specific use cases of the mobile interface you would like to create, it is likely you will be able to narrow down the required services to a relatively small number. It is therefore possible to roll out a whole new mobile interface to your existing infrastructure within a few short weeks or months, depending mostly on the complexity of the services rather than the mobile interface itself.

Finally, there is the question of how to interact with the web services from the point of view of the mobile client. With traditional SOAP web services this is a relatively easy task on the desktop due to the large number of development tools and libraries that provide most of the client code for you. In a mobile operating system, your options are much more limited. In the absence of a helping library, writing an interface to a SOAP web service can be time consuming and challenging. It is therefore a much simpler and more efficient approach to use architectures based on existing transport technologies and semantics. This is the environment where REST-based service architecture excels. Web services based on REST use basic HTTP and can pass data using simple existing formats like XML or JSON. In fact, there are a number of open-source libraries available to read and write JSON data, and more modern versions of mobile operating systems have actually included JSON libraries in their development API. With these tools in hand, calling a REST service becomes a simple act of sending an HTTP request to the right URL and making a simple call to read the JSON response.

On the server side, adding a REST layer over an existing service infrastructure is also relatively straightforward. Many of the existing web service application frameworks already contain features to make the addition of REST services very simple. Also, because the mechanics of calling the services are so simple, the process of testing the services in isolation can be as simple as opening a browser and hitting the right URL.

Obviously, the details can get more complicated than what I have outlined here, but in our business we have been able to prove that using this approach, a couple of developers can create a new mobile interface to an enterprise system in a matter of weeks rather than months.

Author: bridge360blog

Software Changes Everything.... Bridge360 improves and develops custom application software. We specialize in solving complex problems at every phase of the software development lifecycle, removing roadblocks to help our clients’ software and applications reach their full potential in any market. The Bridge360 customer base includes software companies and world technology leaders, leading system integrators, federal and state government agencies, and small to enterprise businesses across the globe. Clients spanning industries from legal to healthcare, automotive to energy, and high tech to high fashion count on us to clear a path for success. Bridge360 was founded in 2001 (as Austin Test) and is headquartered in Austin, Texas with offices in Beijing, China.

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