Top 5 Ways Software Quality Assurance Supports the Development Team

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by Chris Durand, CTO

ChrisDurand-B360Are you thinking Development and Quality Assurance are separate, independent activities? Think again. Development and QA go hand in hand, and the better (and earlier) both teams are engaged in solid quality processes, the stronger your software will be. Here are five ways software quality supports your development team.

1. Software Quality Reduces the Cost of Fixing Bugs

At the risk of beating a dead horse, if you are not familiar with the cost of fixing a bug at various stages in the software lifecycle, this graph is crucial:

Adding more to my investment

As you can see, the later in the development cycle a bug is discovered, the more it costs to fix. If you find a problem in the requirements analysis phase, you simply change the requirements document to fix it. If you don’t discover that same issue until you are testing your beta release, you have to change the requirements document and rewrite code and retest. A good QA process will find defects earlier in the development process and reduce the cost of fixing those defects.

2. Software Quality Improves Requirements

Doing requirements well is hard without a strong software quality process in place. In many projects, testing begins too late since testers don’t start writing test cases until they have (hopefully) working code in their hands to break. If this is your process, you are missing out on the benefits of having the QA team engaged early on in the process. Strong QA professionals have an eye for detail and ensure your requirements are clear and testable. If your QA team cannot start writing test cases based on requirements, it is likely you have insufficient detail in your requirements documentation. This means you are leaving it up to a developer to self-determine many details of how your application should work instead of building a customer-driven application. So if your QA team says they cannot start writing test cases until they have a working application to reference, get them involved early and shore up those requirements.

3. Software Quality Improves Predictability of Releases

Predicting time to completion is challenging on poor quality projects with loose processes and parameters. Again, testing early is key. Feature development has a finite list of things to do, but the number of bugs in an application is unknown until you start testing. A strong QA process tests early and often, so at all stages in the development process you have an idea of where you stand. A weak QA process tests too late or not very thoroughly, and you find your dates slipping because you are still finding more and more bugs with no end in sight. High quality software also has fewer customer support issues and therefore your team can stay focused on new features instead of getting randomly pulled off to deal with the latest customer crisis and torpedoing your release schedule.

4. Software Quality Allows You to Refactor with Confidence

Writing software is a lot like gardening. Old plants must be removed, new plants added, existing plants trimmed and dead growth removed. Failing to keep your software well-groomed results in buggy software that is difficult to understand and expensive to maintain. You find you can’t easily add a simple feature because it breaks something elsewhere. To avoid this you must constantly keep your software pruned, and restructure parts that no longer make sense. Strong software quality allows you to do this with confidence since you know how the software was supposed to work before you made changes, and you can verify the software still works after your changes. If you have an automated unit or functional test infrastructure in place, that’s even better.

5. Software Quality Improves Team Morale

No one likes working on projects that have a bad reputation within the company or with customers.  High quality software improves the morale of everyone from the sales team to the support team. The sales team has confidence that the product won’t blow up in their faces during a demo and that they won’t be damaging future sales opportunities by selling the customer a “lemon”. Developers feel more pride in their work and perform better since they want to maintain the good reputation for the project or team. The support team does not dread yet another call from an upset customer due to issues that clearly should have been caught during the development process.

In summary, if you don’t have strong quality practices in place, your development team (and the rest of the company) is missing out! Get your QA team involved early and often in your development process and watch your development costs shrink, schedules become shorter and more predictable, and customer satisfaction soar. Happy testing!

Author: bridge360blog

Software Changes Everything.... Bridge360 improves and develops custom application software. We specialize in solving complex problems at every phase of the software development lifecycle, removing roadblocks to help our clients’ software and applications reach their full potential in any market. The Bridge360 customer base includes software companies and world technology leaders, leading system integrators, federal and state government agencies, and small to enterprise businesses across the globe. Clients spanning industries from legal to healthcare, automotive to energy, and high tech to high fashion count on us to clear a path for success. Bridge360 was founded in 2001 (as Austin Test) and is headquartered in Austin, Texas with offices in Beijing, China.

2 thoughts on “Top 5 Ways Software Quality Assurance Supports the Development Team

  1. Pingback: How a QA Team Fits into an Agile, TDD/BDD World | bridge360blog

  2. and now i read the new dimension of projecting software testing. Cheers- Asik

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