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Increasing Velocity of Agile Teams

by Benjamin Frech, Senior Software Engineer

Ben-FrechIncreasing a team’s productivity is a ubiquitous goal. But, how do you achieve that goal?

To many, it may be tempting to use velocity as a measure of productivity, but the value of a story point can vary significantly over time. Once you get past counterproductive answers like, “let’s inflate all our story points by 50%,” you’re left with options that can actually increase your team’s productivity or, at least, facilitate collaboration between team members.

In my experience, the top two methods of truly increasing productivity involve creating a comfortable work environment, and addressing technical debt and developer concerns. Continue reading


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Best Practices: How to Gain Adoption and Ensure Software Quality

by Diane Kenyon, VP of Engineering and Operations

Diane picBenjamin Franklin famously stated that, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” In the world of quality software, that analogy may be underestimated. Errors in software development discovered at the release stage are greatly more expensive and difficult to repair than when discovered during the testing and development stages.

While there are no guarantees of perfect success, establishing best practices for development and properly educating your team of those guidelines will significantly reduce the likelihood of errors and diminish their impact. The key lies in making sure everyone knows the rules to the point of being able to quote them, and that each person understands his/her responsibilities within the project. Culture, compliance needs, expectations and risks all go into establishing a framework for success.

Following this structured process for defining and hardening your best practices improves consistent adoption across all team members: Continue reading


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The Exciting Potential Of Agile Software Development

by Morgan McCollough, Senior Software Engineer

Morgan McCollough Bridge360In the first week of June, I made the trek to Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas to attend the Agile Development and Better Software Conference. The conference itself was only two days, but I attended a three-day Agile scrum master training class beforehand. It rounded out a full week immersed in all things Agile.

I’ve worked with a number of clients who claimed to have adopted Agile in one form or another. I’ve also read quite a bit about it, but prior to my week in Las Vegas, I had never received any formal training. The trip was eye opening, and it was a great opportunity to talk with people from across the industry.

What really became obvious was just how many companies are successfully implementing Agile processes at both the software development and program management levels. Some are achieving pretty dramatic results, with up to 30% shorter schedules and 75% fewer defects on average! However, learning the formal practice of Agile also made it clear how much dysfunction still exists, even in companies claiming the Agile moniker. Continue reading


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Outsourcing Management Of Offshore Teams — Should You Consider It?

By Brenda Hall, CEO

Brenda_Hall_100_x_120Here’s some great news: despite whatever views we may have of how unemployment figures are determined, the economy continues to recover. In many parts of the US, a number of jobs are not getting filled; this also holds true for offshore staffing companies. I know many recruiters who are having difficulty keeping up with demand and finding an adequate number of candidates with the skills employers need.

Frequently, as businesses grow and need to scale, owners and managers find they have too much to do and not enough time to do it, so they pay less attention to the offshore/outsourced resources available to them. Taking your ‘eye off the ball’ here can cause havoc with your teams, both locally and offshore.

Some questions to consider:

How does offshore sourcing affect your productivity and product quality? What will you do when release schedules are missed, or worse, your software is released with issues? How does this influence your corporate strategic goals and customer satisfaction? Continue reading


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Invisible Pillars of Development: Motivation, Morale, Skill, Diversity, and Chemistry

by Phil Smith, Vice President of Operations and Services

Phil Smith Bridge360A few months back I wrote a blog for this site that talked about 3 pillars of development that are visible: cost, schedule, and quality. Like arithmetic, these items are fact-based with little room for interpretation. Dollars, time, and adherence to requirements are all measurable and tangible. Multiply this, divide by that, and you can measure earned value and know if your project is ahead, behind, or progressing as expected.

Yet the most important dynamics of the workplace are not always measureable. For instance, how is team morale? Does the organization have enough diversity? Is the team chemistry contributing to overall performance, or hurting it? This time around I’ve elected to write about things that are more subjective, including the less visible “pillars” of development and the unspoken roles of team leadership.

Let’s look at that first.

A project manager works within the realm of cost, schedule, and quality. It is possible to affect one or two of these elements by making adjustments to the other(s). For example, we can reduce cost and advance the schedule if we are willing to sacrifice quality.

A project leader creates an environment where motivation, morale, skills, diversity, and chemistry all contribute to improved cost, schedule, and quality. It is important for us to think at a higher level specifically about these items that I’ve listed, because improving these areas is the best way to affect cost, schedule, and quality without having to make sacrifices.

Now I’ve stepped into a leadership dialog that may require multiple books to explain. Given that this is a blog and that my goal is to invoke thought, I’ll stick with the high level and will let the people who write books do their writing. In fact, I’ve included some books at the end of this blog that I believe cover these topics quite extensively.

I do want to share some of my own thoughts and I invite you to comment on the blog with your own ideas in return. In the title of the article I refer to the following concepts as development pillars as well, because they are essential to success. Continue reading


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3 Visible Pillars – Cost, Quality, Schedule

by Phil Smith, Vice President of Operations and Services

Phil Smith Bridge360Searching the Internet for “information technology project failure rates” will provide a wealth of data and information. Data is readily available in depressingly large volumes from studies that indicate that investing in IT projects is high-risk and unwise. There is useful text accompanying the statistics that explains root cause and even classes of failures. I like these sites because the content is well organized and they include recommendations for how to avoid failure.

The sites are:  Why Projects Fail, McKinsey Report Highlights Failure of Large Projects, and Gartner Survey Shows Why Projects Fail.

The Project Management Institute (PMI) was launched in 1984. The PMI material, certifications, frameworks (and everything else offered) are invaluable to any organization that runs an IT project. I applaud the PMI for giving the world of project management context and rigor to not only talk about improvement, but also a way to build methodologies to achieve the improvements.

Yet the statistics available from current studies, over 25 years after the PMI started helping us, are disastrous. According to the Calleam site listed above, a McKinsey & Company survey from 2012 showed that 17% of large scale IT projects fail so badly they threaten the existence of the company.

Again, there is no lack of material or training, even beyond what the PMI makes available, to help our IT industry improve. I often think of the maturity of the IT industry in comparison to the maturity of other industries like medicine, manufacturing, engineering, and construction. History indicates that assuming that customers will continue to invest due to lack of an alternative has turned industries and companies inside out once a suitable alternative becomes available. It is in our best interest to be in control of the revolution.

I know I’ve stepped into a complex dialog here, specifically with the subject of how to get the entire industry to move toward one common set of methods, practices, and cost structures. I argue the absence of common structure creates a gap that is filled by the client’s choice to bring unique and unrealistic expectations for cost, timing, and quality. Most consumers of IT services are well educated and know that writing a line of code only costs as much as the pay rate multiplied by the actual effort, which is not much.  Yes, that is the wrong way to measure cost but it is the way that most consumers elect to measure it in a negotiation, because we as an industry lack structure.  To compare, my recent trip to the doctor cost my insurers over $200, and I only saw the doctor for about 5 minutes.  I’m sure that along with the 5 minutes I was also paying for a lot of staff, infrastructure, insurance, training, equipment, and capability that all came together to make the 5 minutes possible.  And the doctor does not invoice the insurance company for the 5 minutes he spent, instead he associates it to a billable service with a preset fee.  That approach allows him to be there for me when I need him.

In our IT world, individual projects are bound by unrealistic expectations from clients. Referring back to all the sound advice and training available from the above referenced sites, and from PMI, we know that project plans, which incorporate the boundaries of cost, quality, and schedule, must consider everything that is required to deliver an entire solution, not just the individual point in time that an engineer is writing a specific line of code. For example, that line of code, in order to be correct, must be written with an appropriate technology, within an architected solution that is secure, accessible, reliable, tested, and maintainable. Those adjectives are not free.  They are in place because of hard work, training, and process.

The pillars of cost, quality, and schedule are non-negotiable once established. If a project fails, it failed because one or more of these three pillars cracked, or crumbled. Establishing them correctly up front will significantly reduce the opportunity for them to bear pressure during a project. Establishing them correctly requires that we manage expectations that include the teachings from PMI and from the lessons learned in the industry.

In summary, we need to plan for things like validation of requirements with stakeholders. We need to plan for things like training, performance testing, failover, risk management, system documentation, traceability… I could go on. My larger picture argument is that I hope that someday we’ll take this approach as an industry rather than as individual service providers.  We should be differentiated by our ability to deliver rather than win business based on our ability to negotiate ourselves into low cost and inadequate delivery.

Set the pillars in place, build the plan based on the pillars, and deliver to the plan.

Please, share your thoughts and opinions on this topic and let’s see where the dialogue takes us.


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Leading, Managing, Doing

By:  Philip Smith

Phil Smith Bridge360I recently traveled to Europe on a business trip and was sitting up late in the hotel catching up on things that had happened at the home office while I was in flight.  I had the TV on in the background with a World War II documentary to keep me company. Fortunately the documentary ended and I was able to get back to the business at hand, but not before I picked up on a recurring point the documentary was making, which was Rommel’s impressive ability to lead his armies both strategically and tactically.  General Erwin Johannes Eugen Rommel (15 November 1891 – 14 October 1944), popularly known as The Desert Fox, continuously sought out ways to be unpredictable and grabbed geographic advantages even when it did not look possible. Fortunately for the Allied forces, Rommel usually over-achieved his goals, unintentionally overextending his ability to hold a region, or leaving a critical supply line vulnerable.

I actually committed to this blog title a while back, as I was planning to write about the difference between leading, managing, and doing.  I was going to differentiate leaders as people who motivate, encourage, strategize, manage risk, and build balance within the business domain (people, business, and customer). I was going to describe the doers as the people who have the skills, training, capability, and motivation to show up for work every day and get the job done, whatever that job might be.  These doers have respect for their profession and manage their career to the best of their ability. The managers in the middle bring it all together. They are the team builders, the front lines to the client, the make-sure-it-gets-done-no-matter-what people, and the example to the rest of the team. I was going to dig into these concepts and attempt to surface some original wisdom.

However, that documentary took me briefly away from my workplace and put me on a different thought plane about leadership. The wisdom here is that success can result from surprising the competition. Internally, a leader must be consistent and predictable, such that the established vision can actually be achieved. Externally, it is best to leave competitors wondering what you, the market leader might be reinventing.

Managers are the people who enable leaders to lead. Their ability to comprehend the challenges their teams face while also working in support the larger objectives requires them to be creative on a daily basis. The team members who work in support of the managers also bring creativity to their work. At Bridge360, our people invent and reinvent on a daily basis, regardless of role. Sure, we’re not lighting homes on fire to conceal our forces (that would be ridiculous in peace time), but we are finding better ways to implement complex business rules in a legacy payment system. We are helping a client use new technology to improve their collection of marketing information, which will help with market penetration. We are implementing a website with reusable design elements and code snippets to allow a client to accelerate a massive technology refresh. And in the business that we were founded on, testing, we are deploying key people with key skill sets to make sure that our client’s new projects are brought to market in a reliable fashion. These projects require clearly defined roles, as well as the flexibility to be nimble and shape-shift (or even fully integrate ourselves into our client’s team structure) based on what the project may require.

Leading, managing, and doing… we are accomplishing it in surprising ways at all levels in the organization, and more importantly we are doing it for and with our clients.