Morgan McCollough Bridge360


1 Comment

Is Silverlight Right for Your Development Team?

by Morgan McCullough

Before making the choice to use Silverlight or any other development tool, it is always important to examine the requirements and trade-offs.

Because Silverlight is a Web technology that allows the creation of rich Internet applications, it is positioned to offer many of the same benefits as a traditional Web application. The application can be centrally located and managed, and because it is accessible over the Web, can be used through corporate firewalls and does not require installation on client machines. Also, there is less need to move data around between disparate systems and a single interface can greatly simplify data access and security management. In general, Web applications are more manageable, highly deployable, easier to secure, and very often less expensive overall.

In light of all this, the question becomes what Silverlight offers above and beyond a traditional Web application that uses a combination of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to create the client experience. In a business environment where Web applications have become commonplace, the capabilities of Silverlight must be compelling enough to make it worth the cost of time and resources. As with any new technology, the reality is that working with it effectively takes an investment for the development team to become familiar with its capabilities and pitfalls. An existing development team may be able to produce a traditional Web application with many of the same features as a Silverlight application in a shorter amount of time if you factor in time lost to research and study. Continue reading

Morgan McCollough Bridge360


Leave a comment

What is Silverlight?

by Morgan McCollough

Silverlight is a relatively new technology from Microsoft that offers some of the same features as Adobe Flash, including multimedia, graphics, and interactivity in a Web context. It is distributed as a browser plug-in that provides a single run-time environment that can be used across multiple browsers in much the same way that Flash can be.

Some might question why Microsoft would go to the trouble of writing its own version of a tool that has become nearly ubiquitous across the Web. The obvious answer is that Microsoft is once again attempting to use its monopolistic power to gain control over yet another sector of the market–which would make sense, given Microsoft’s latest attempts to increase its footprint in various sectors of the Internet market. However, there is another, less obvious answer.

Recent developments seem to suggest that Microsoft is not really pushing Silverlight as a complete replacement for Adobe Flash. While it is true that Silverlight can serve the same purpose in terms of supporting multimedia-intensive websites, e.g. Netflix, it seems that Microsoft is putting more focus on the technology as a Web application development platform. Continue reading